Feb 2020 Edition - SMEs Feedbacks

How does Emotional Intelligence serve project managers while managing complex projects?

Monique Russell
February 2020 Edition
Monique Russell

Monique Russell

Executive Communications Expert | Emotional Intelligence | Teaching Women Leaders How to Gain Clarity & Confidence

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Project Managers have an extremely important job of ensuring the business runs smoothly and efficiently in predominantly stressful environments. They are skilled and talented at leading the process, but often struggle to effectively lead the people—and that includes themselves. When leading without Emotional Intelligence, the typical obstacles of having decision making challenges, repetitive requests being met with incomplete or no response at all, lack of engagement and more ends up increasing stress and conflict to critical levels where project managers begin to experience deterioration in health, fulfillment and mental sanity.

 

Understanding how to leverage the skills of Emotional Intelligence helps project managers maintain relevance by enhancing self-awareness in communication styles, energy levels, triggers and most importantly, people skills. They are able to stretch their personality, request additional support, and/or facilitate difficult conversations. But this doesn’t happen overnight, and it is not something that can be done by yourself. A very smart scientist at NASA, led a highly emotional and difficult project without Emotional Intelligence and it caused him to suffer to the point that no one would look him in the eye. Later, in a management course, he learned there was a better way to lead and to gain consensus rather than approaching it with data and logic alone.  

 


If you’d like to learn more, listen to my podcast episode on Emotional Intelligence: The Key To Keep Your Project Running Smoothly on the Manage This podcast (https://www.velociteach.com/2017/12/episode-48-emotional-intelligence-key-keep-project-running-smoothly/) or you send me a direct message on LinkedIn to explore training for your team.

 


Ilona Jerabek
February 2020 Edition
Ilona Jerabek

Ilona Jerabek

CEO PsychTests | EQ/leadership coach

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How EQ can help a Project Manager

Unless a person is in the entertainment field, the role of emotions at work may seem trivial, if not counterproductive. Why should empathy matter in sales, self-motivation in IT, or emotional reflection in management? Because emotions are part of our humanity, and we have to deal with our own and other people’s emotions on a daily basis.
Aside from being able to shuffle between the different aspects of a project, Project Managers must also juggle the different social and emotional elements that working on a team entails. PMs must have high EQ in order to:

• Detect and manage their own emotions, and handle the pressure of being the leader of a project.
• Be able to consult their gut feeling to detect possible issues, and evaluate alternative solutions.
• Read the body language of their team members when assigning tasks and getting project updates, in order to pick up on stress, frustration, or unexpressed concerns.
• Effectively navigate team dynamics, conflicting priorities, and the different goals, needs, and constraints at play.
• Resolve disagreements and come up with compromises and trade-offs, which requires diplomacy, empathy, and compassion.
Zaimah  Khan
February 2020 Edition
Zaimah  Khan

Zaimah Khan

Founder

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It's 2020. We’re in a state of unprecedented change in the workplace and there are many things that can go wrong over the course of a day let alone the length of a project. Possessing strong emotional intelligence skills can make the difference between a Project Manager (PM) leading his or her team to failure or success. There are three key competencies from Daniel Goleman and Richard Boyatzis emotional and social intelligence leadership framework that can greatly serve PMs when managing complex projects.
  1. Adaptability: PMs that possess this competency don’t let changes derail the project. There are many tweaks and adjustments that have to be made over the course of completing a project, and PMs who can rise to the challenge of taking things that come are more successful. 
  2. Organizational Awareness: PMs who have a strong sense of organizational awareness can successfully work with all the stakeholders involved because they know the culture and values of the organization, along with the written and unwritten rules within an organization that help them navigate through systems and structures to get things done. 
  3. Coach and Mentor: As the PM you help set the vision, and motivate and encourage your team and you also have to make sure that all the deliverables are met, so at times you also have to be an enforcer. Developing this key emotional intelligence competency, allows you to get the best work out of your team. 
Uzoamaka  Okoli
February 2020 Edition
Uzoamaka  Okoli

Uzoamaka Okoli

Operations Manager

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Within the ambit of professionalism, emotional Intelligence is key to unlocking great potentials while forging formidable relationships among team members as our roles as project managers  is embedded in obtaining results through people and other resources.
 It simply means therefore that for us to succeed, we must possess the ability to build synergy and encourage team spirit in our work taking into cognizance the personalities of each and every member of the team without sabotaging the basic work place ethics. I have come to realize in this work that communication is key. The manner in which information is passed across, the tone or language of the speaker and even some thing as simple as body language can be interpreted the wrong way.   Communicate each step of the project appropriately with project team members best done during meetings. If conflicts among team members arises, it is best handled inter personally as soon as possible to avoid breeding contempt.

 A good project Manager is a natural buddy to everyone, you need this trait to gain access to some information which naturally you wouldn’t have been privy to but very necessary for the success of your project.

 All in all, a good project manager is tactful, diplomatic and a true leader are true qualities you must possess when dealing with people to ensure that you hit your milestone. 
Kevin Hoxha
February 2020 Edition
Kevin Hoxha

Kevin Hoxha

Product Manager

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Emotion is the energy that moves individuals, teams and the whole world. Your feelings can be the energizer to reach your goal or your pit-stop.
Your own emotions are important to be understood, but for a leader it is as much important to understand the emotions of people around him.
How we are going to manage the energy of a team if we don’t know how do they feel about team goals, colleagues and current situations?
Well, the answer to that is that we cannot, at least not to its full potential. The more emotion you put into the team the more of that you will receive.
Being Emotional Intelligent means that you have clarity about situations and about people around you.
Once you connect with emotions of your team you will be able to manage change and conflict easier and go faster towards mutual goals. That is why you need to encourage people to express their self, be more involved in conversations, and actively listen.
Complexity within specific projects can produce unexpected issues that may affect team energy.
Creating a safe environment for improvement and growth, will develop confidence to be more proactive within the team versus the issues.  It is important to understand that anyone can make mistakes. Sharing constructive feedback will help to learn from mistakes and use them to move forward.
You will be able to move your team from competitive area to collaborative area. And that is where “the magic” happens.  
Mounina Tounkara
February 2020 Edition
Mounina Tounkara

Mounina Tounkara

Project Management Consultant

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“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Maya Angelou
Complex projects imply uncertainty, ambiguity, and under these conditions, the mastering of emotion becomes the condition sine qua non for successful management.
Emotional Intelligence abilities such as self-awareness, adaptability, empathy, and positive outlook are meaningful to the modern work world and increasingly required in complex environments.
Self-awareness to effective decision-making
Human beings are continually experiencing emotions, yet we are unaware of them. The information these emotions give us influences most of the decisions we make. Self-awareness serves Project Managers to be in tune with themselves, which brings them the clarity that spurs effective decision-making.
Empathy and adaptability to better engage stakeholders and teams
Complexity in projects means dealing with Stakeholders with different personalities and cultures. As “you cannot fake caring and trust,” empathy helps you understand why people do what they do regardless of cultural or belief systems differences. When we stop labeling people we can’t relate with as “difficult,” then we start building caring and trust with everyone.
Positivity for Greater Performance
The mood of Project Managers makes the difference whether a positive work climate that arouses cooperation in teams or a negative one in which suspicion and withholding information are the norms.
To sum up, we invite Project Managers to fill in their tool bag with Emotional Intelligence competencies because lacking them in complex environments can lead to disastrous situations. 
Eman ElRashidy
February 2020 Edition
Eman ElRashidy

Eman ElRashidy

IT Projects Manager | Program Manager

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Managing complex projects requires a great deal of analysis and understanding of project key success factors, efficient handling of different stakeholders in such challenging projects is usually one of these factors, we need to always remember that project managers are human beings with feelings that sometimes are strong enough to drive the project and introduce negative impact on it, it’s very important that projects managers are aware of their behaviors and always question their motives, we often fall into the trap of making decisions that seem rational while it’s based on emotions.

We are all aware that it’s always easier to judge things from outside and act accordingly, those who don’t have empathy to understand others motives and emotions might be eventually not tackling the real issue, in complex projects where we have diverse stakeholders and tightly coupled components, things can go out of control if the real issues are not detected and handled properly.

I have read before that emotions can be considered as a process created by us, if we create it then we can improve, regulate and manage it, and given that we are dealing with stakeholders that have emotions, we can consider managing their emotions considering our followed code of ethics and this is achieved by learning and developing the skill of emotional intelligence.

Syed Akber Abbas
February 2020 Edition
Syed Akber Abbas

Syed Akber Abbas

Document Control Manager

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Emotional intelligence (EQ) should be primary skill for any leader in modern era, while managing complex project, we have numbers of stakeholders and in many places we saw multinationalties working together, they all have diiferent goals to be accomplished like as document controller, his role to manage and control project documents, Construction manager managing construction activities and others playings their roles as per their expertise, here leader role is vital, how he / she is handling or managing large scale projects with different expert of various professions.
Leader is the one who have big influence on their team, as a mentor he / she should capable to lead from front, self managing, self regulation, motivation, socialism  are key elements to build leader personality and fundamentals of emotional intelligence (EQ).
EQ helps leader in numbers of positive ways, every one  or all stakeholders will  be accountable by their own, good professional enviorment create  between multinationalties, ethically respect between different professions, motivate team to accomplished their goals on project, socially interactions makes team closer to each other.
Leader should know how to be effected othervise don't expect wining or progressive result from team, in complex project we are surrondings from different stakeholders, effective management is only in hands of leader and (EQ) skill help him / her to be a influencer on Project team.
Anila Bashllari
February 2020 Edition
Anila Bashllari

Anila Bashllari

Transformational Coach & Mindset enhancer

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 does Emotional Intelligence serve project managers while managing complex projects?
 
When projects are complex require a different set of skills: a good combination of technical and interpersonal skills. What happens now a days in different corporations and organizations? People are promoted because of their technical performance ignoring that managerial positions require more than 70% interpersonal skills.
 
I recall the statement about high managerial positions that “People are hired because of high IQ and fired because of low EQ (Emotional Quotient) or in other words Emotional Intelligence.
 
Emotional Intelligence helps people to develop self-awareness on their thinking process and emotions as they happen, allowing them to control them better. It is evident that when we are emotional our Central Executive Network (CEN) shuts down and we are already “hijacked “by Emotional Network (EN) an area in the brain that corresponds to Limbic Brain or known differently as primitive brain. In such situation we are not rational at all and we can surely regret any saying, decision or action taken in those moments. But when a manager is intelligent emotionally, he can be aware of what is going on at the moment (and this happens in Nano- seconds when a person has high emotional Intelligence) and use questions instead of statements and declarations. Good questions embed empathy (a very important quality of a leader’s character) and turn the other person inside to search for answers instead of being defendant. This way a lot of conflicts can be avoid.
 
As mentioned above emotional Intelligence raises self-control helping the project manager to relax under stressful conditions and pressure. This allows him/her to think rationally and take right decisions and actions. Do you recall the expression that whenever you are emotional don’t take any important decision? It is exactly what I meant above.
 
By showing self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation[1] and empathy a leader, manager can demonstrate social skills, being liked and trusted by others and what is most important being seen as a leader.


[1] Self-motivation is the ability to overcome negative feelings and go ahead
Jane Ryan
February 2020 Edition
Jane Ryan

Jane Ryan

Certified International Emotional Intelligence | Futurist Executive Coach | Leadership Transformation | Career Coach

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Emotional Intelligence boils down to one’s ability to be smart with their feelings. It is the ability to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior to achieve goals. Every project has goals to achieve and a finish line to cross. The more complex a project is, the more emotional intelligence is needed so that everyone on the project team can effectively navigate and overcome the challenges, build decision networks, and collaborate with each other to ensure a project’s success.
 
Emotional intelligence is a skill we all possess and like any other skill, for it to become stronger, we first need to learn it and then apply it repetitively until we are competent in such skill. The reason emotional intelligence helps project managers to effectively manage complex projects is because it strengthens their ability to lead others through the complexities of a project. This is accomplished through clear, concise, well-tuned communication so that everyone understands their roles and responsibilities on the project team. Strong emotional intelligence is necessary for project team leaders and teams because it strengthens one’s ability to be agile, adaptable, flexible and focused with minimal stress during complex and challenging projects. Simply put, Emotional Intelligence helps project managers quickly build the rapport and trust needed to engage project team members and to communicate effectively during all aspects of a complex project.
Archana Behera
February 2020 Edition
Archana Behera

Archana Behera

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“People’s emotions are rarely put into words, far more often they are expressed through other cues.
The key to intuiting another's feelings is in the ability to read nonverbal channels, tone of voice, gesture, facial expression and the like”
― Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence.
Project Managers must have talent, knowledge and skills. With these qualities, Emotional Intelligence also plays a vital role. Emotional Intelligence is about understanding and managing owns and others emotions. This helps the leaders to run the project successfully.
Emotional Intelligence requires in every step of Project Management. Project Managers deal with People every day to make the project complete and successful.
During scope management, Emotional Intelligence helps a Project managers to perform brainstorming sessions, Negotiation, influencing and freezing the scope, to avoid scope creep.
When the project manager delegate assignments to the team, the Emotional Intelligence helps to understand which resource can perform which assignment as per their strengths. When the team struggles with time pressure to complete the task the Project manager uses the Emotional Intelligence to work out on the solutions to avoid the roadblocks.
This is the most obvious field where a project manager need to deal with the resources to make the job done. Within this process, PM uses Emotional Intelligence to resolve conflict, negotiate with the team, and building good working relationship. Emotional Intelligence also helps most when the team under goes Storming phase of Tuckman model.
It works well for stakeholder management and managing politics. It also helps in managing own/others expectation. When Project manager understands others emotions, that helps in providing appreciative feedback. Also by managing own emotions, Project managers welcomes feedback. Which keeps the team motivated and focused on a common goal. Builds a healthy and trustworthy environment.
A project Manager can improve the Emotional Intelligence, by doing the below practices.
1.      Taking training on managing success with positive attitude.
2.      Performing Yoga, exercise and good health
3.      Keep motivating and inspiring yourself and others
4.      Being focused
5.      Understanding your strength and others
6.      Socialism
7.      Empathy
Emotions - when not in control, that shows the path of Hell. And when realized and managed that will take you to cloud nine. By - Archana Behera
Phil Johnson
February 2020 Edition
Phil Johnson

Phil Johnson

C Level Executive Coach

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World Economic Forum has identified emotional intelligence as a Top-10 skill in 2020. Connecting with our authenticity and emotional intelligence enables us to embrace change while raising our consciousness. No one can obtain results beyond their current level of consciousness.

The development of an organization’s authentic leadership and emotional intelligence is their key advantage in the marketplace. The trigger for irreversible cultural change has occurred and the world will never be the same.

Historically the market value of a company was often considered to be roughly twice its net asset value. Now the market value of a growing number of companies is, in some cases, forty or fifty times their net asset value. Why the change? It is because the market is beginning to understand and truly value the importance of the human capital within an organization (Harvard Business Review).
Jonathan Ray
February 2020 Edition
Jonathan Ray

Jonathan Ray

Agile Enthusiast | Certified Scrum Master | Agile Coach

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As a Scrum Master I believe emotional intelligence to be considered a critical attribute for any role within an Agile environment, but I believe project managers require this in order to succeed in a project environment. For instance, having self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation behaviors will create a sense of ownership, respect, moral value and aspiration to the work in the project and add a sense of personal dedication and personal commitment to the successful completion of the project. These behaviors also signify the importance of emotional intelligence and the value of developing a comfortable environment for project teams.

Self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation are a few examples of the soft skills that project managers should exercise to create a more productive working environment that can lead to the success of the project.

Anthony Eid
February 2020 Edition
Anthony Eid

Anthony Eid

IT Project Manager

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Emotional intelligence (EQ) is key to the success of any professional, no matter their job description. In particular, Project managers (PMs) who show high EQ tend to have a competitive advantage over others. Why? Simply put, managing a project, no matter the complexity, really boils down to leading a team (people) to work well together in order to get something done on time, on budget and with quality. The key word here is "people". A great PM would be someone who mainly knows how to read people, communicate with them, solve conflicts and get the best out of them in a relationship where trust thrives.

Here's one example (among a multitude of others) where a EQ is highly beneficial:

One of the most essential aspects for a successful project is selecting proper project stakeholders, according to several criteria such as their availability, personality, competencies, etc. Overlooking your resources (team) at hand and only counting on a powerful project plan, your execution & control process will likely deliver unsatisfactory project results. How many PMs take time to carefully select human resources, on board & train their project team on their tasks (rather than quickly jumping on implementation)?

How many PMs take time to build healthy working relationships before or during a project? Most of the time, this far outweighs the importance and effectiveness of business processes, policies & procedures. Someone who likes and trusts you will likely perform much better than someone who simply has a PM that only follows processes and rules.

An EQ-focused PM builds relationship, aims to build a great project team where trust & empathy thrive and seeks to deliver both a quality project and satisfied team upon closing.
Margaret Meloni
February 2020 Edition
Margaret Meloni

Margaret Meloni

Creating project managers who have the skills & knowledge to navigate the art & science of project management.

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Emotional Intelligence prevents unproductive conflict
When you are self-aware (one of the five components of EQ) you understand your moods. Who do you think is more likely to engage in unproductive conflict? A person in a good mood or a person in a bad mood? Of course, you picked the person who is in a bad mood right? To build on that, imagine the person who walks around completely unaware of their emotions. Who knows what is going to set them off, they certainly don’t know.


Emotional Intelligence helps YOU navigate productive conflict
Sometimes disagreements are a good thing. When you lead your team through issue resolution, not every team member will suggest the same solution. From that productive conflict, the best and most creative solution can be designed. But only if YOU and your team can draw upon your self-awareness, self-control, motivation, empathy and social skills (all you guessed it components of EQ) to work together. As you work through the conflict you are drawing upon your awareness of your feelings during the conflict and your self-control to behave professionally. You are motivated to work things out and care about seeing the issue through until the best solution is found. You don’t care if the solution selected is your solution, you care that it is the right solution. You employ active listening (part of empathy) to guide the team through the discussion and you draw upon your social skills to seek participation from all appropriate parties.
Gosia Walendzik
February 2020 Edition
Gosia Walendzik

Gosia Walendzik

Change Consultant

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Based on my experience of working on many complex projects, emotional intelligence is key but often taken for granted or even forgotten or assumed. Is emotional intelligence one of the traits of a great Project Manager? Perhaps it is, however not always. If the role also encompasses making sure people affected by the change, buy-in to the end vision then yes, it is imperative, as understanding people’s behaviours will often be the first indicator to the project's success or failure. However, if the role is only concerned with tracking project progress then I could argue it is not required. Emotional intelligence in change manager roles – that is the key skill!
Brijesh Nair
February 2020 Edition
Brijesh Nair

Brijesh Nair

Founder & Director, Prudent Consultants

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Managing projects in today's conditions like VUCA world, dynamically changing environment, volatile market conditions, rapidly changing technological advancements, etc are becoming more and more challenging for the project managers to lead teams and invariably demanding to walk the "Extra Mile" on every single occasion, almost a daily routine affair. Hence, it is important for project managers to acquire and develop the right skill sets which would, in turn, facilitate them to achieve more as a team rather than carrying the entire load on his/her shoulders all alone, especially if the project manager has to manage multiple projects with either most or some of the work packages distributed at locations geographically on different time zones. I have been talking to various global leadership teams on various platforms, at-least across 120+ Global MNCs and the most common feedback I get from all is that they all are looking for the key skill of "Empathy" in the leadership team, which actually allows them to put in the shoe's of others and think how it would feel, had the same happened to me! Trust is the foundation of any relationship and you need to trust your team, actively listen to their issues to understand their concerns and NOT to react immediately, amicably resolve issues/disputes and more importantly empower the team to take decisions. It works on the principle of "Together we achieve more", which is only possible if the entire team works together as one Cohesive unit breaking all the silos. The project manager plays the most crucial role by consistently demonstrating skills of "Emotional Intelligence" & aligning the team for project delivery!
Thomas Walenta
February 2020 Edition
Thomas Walenta

Thomas Walenta

Project Manager

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Emotional Intelligence serves anybody to be more happy and a valuable member of communities. Project managers at large deal with stakeholders, sponsor, client, the project team, users, outside interested parties. They not only are a member of the project community, they are the leader (hopefully), they are watched and evaluated and often become a role model, if they like that or not. That is why integrity and consistency are important, people do not like surprises, and if they shall trust you, you have to give them the security of being predictable and fair. Project managers for complex projects have to navigate a more diverse stakeholder constituency, with more differing interests and targets, maybe members coming in and going out more frequently (I was on a project which took me 1 day per week to acquire new members). In complex projects the diverse interests and influences of stakeholders require the project manager to exert influence and to borrow power from stakeholders. Influencing others is the final value of Emotional Intelligence. It requires that you know yourself and can control your emotions, which results in more rational behavior and self-confidence. Self-awareness helps you close any blind spots, to close the gap between your view of yourself and how others perceive you. It mitigates hubris and may lead you to the most important leadership competency: humility. After you worked on yourself by working in your self-awareness and self-control, you can focus on working with others. As with self-awareness, being aware of others helps you understand reality better, and how the feel and what they perceive. The word is empathy, key skills are active listening, observing facial expressions and body language and asking questions. And controlling your feeling to jump in with information or judgement (self-control and humility). Empathy cannot be faked, you have to change your mindset to really care about others - in that moment you engage. Women are often more empathic than men, both can and should improve themselves. The last emotional intelligence competency I call influencing. Like with self-control you now want to control the feelings and decisions by others. Wait a moment - isn't this manipulation and a violation of their freedom? It may be and in reality it is quite often. Think for example marketing ads, political statements, car sales, electioneering. But sometimes influence is positive for the recipients: in growing your kids, training your students, forming a project team or convincing users of the benefits of a new system (called change management). So what is the difference? Ethics. Influencing that is done for an ethical reason usually results in results that are perceived by all as positive. Influencing that violates ethical values are seen as ... unethical and detrimental. So what are the ethical values that are good reasons and should not be violated? Rushworth-Kidder researched in many countries and found a list that is practically seen in every culture he observed as common human values. The top eight he found, and not given in a particular sequence, are honesty, responsibility, respect, humility, fairness, community, freedom, compassion. Think about it: if these values are preserved you do not object to being influenced.
Rakesh Verma
February 2020 Edition
Rakesh Verma

Rakesh Verma

Network Planning & Engineering Manager

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Emotional intelligence has raised an increasing interest in leadership development and the temporary nature of projects relates emotions to project management. It must be noted that most of the concepts of emotional intelligence can be identified in project management practices, but there is a need to review project managers’ emotional self-awareness and self-management. In straightforward way, it can be said that emotionally intelligent project managers could enhance project teamwork by identifying and understanding the emotions of team members and acting upon them in regards to what is best for the project and the individuals as project team members. Project management frameworks and models are continuously developing through best practices and standards to improve productivity in project organisations. According to Association for Project Management Body Of Knowledge (APMBOK) (2006, p. 69): "The role of leadership in a project is to promote the project objectives, encourage positive relationships, support effective teamwork, raise morale, and empower and inspire individuals." Naturally many different situations arise during a project life cycle, but many times it is the skill set of the project manager that dictates the project outcome. Problem-solving skills are also essential for the project manager, and according to Schön (1983), to become good at it an individual needs to consciously analyse their experiences and reflect-in-action. Furthermore, individual’s emotional competences have been discovered to be associated as becoming a reflective practitioner (Winter etal., 2006). However, the project failure rates are high, and interestingly much of the project failure is not related to knowledge or know-how, but to project participants’ lack of social intelligence, personal skills, poor leadership, inadequate communication and inability to solve conflicts (Srica, 2008). In other words, failure seems to depend largely on the human side of project management. Generally emotional intelligence is a person’s ability to identify and understand one’s own and others emotions correctly, and manage those emotions in a desired way.Leadership theories related to skills and behaviours have been mainly developed at the time, in the beginning of twentieth century, when organisations were seen as rational and bureaucratic entities. At that time, emotions were seen as irrational, dangerous for intelligence and intellectuality, and as a threat to standardisation of work outputs, since emotions were generally seen as something to carefully manage and restrain. According to Hughes, Ginnett and Curphy (2012) around the twenty-first century, beside the Intelligence Quotient measure (IQ), other modes of intelligence, such as practical intelligence, creative intelligence and emotional intelligence (EQ) were suggested. EI abilities are associated with a range of work-related behaviours and suggested that EI may hold the key to enhanced performance of project managers. The uncertain nature and complex characteristics of projects might place a severe importance for project managers to possess emotional intelligence competencies. The temporary nature of projects, which requires rapid creation of trust and commitment of project manager toward the project team, which is linked in building interpersonal relationships. High emotional intelligence and empathy should also enable project manager to create higher levels of motivation in project workers and also help to successfully manage conflicts and misunderstandings as they occur. In a nutshell, EI is a very important dimesion of project management that ust be addressed right from the begining of the project. EI plays high level of influence on success or failure of any project. And hence the project manager must be nicely equipped to handle this.